ESTIETIQUE

thesmithian:

The Sapeurs are a group of gentlemen…from Brazzaville, the capital of the Republic of Congo. Guinness’ marketing director for Western Europe set out to tell a different  story of the  Congo…

[it has over a million views].

ourafrica:

@GuinnessIreland documentary on Congo’s Sapeurs ( “Le Sape)

In this documentary we illustrate the brightly coloured and social affairs that bring the ‘Sapeurs’ together. Their bold choice to live an unexpected lifestyle is a source of celebrated originality and positivity. Their life is not defined by occupation or wealth, but by respect, a moral code and an inspirational display of flair and creativity. The Sapeurs show us that whilst in life you cannot always choose your circumstances, you can always choose who you are. 

View our posts on these stylish men here:

[part 1] - http://www.ourafricablog.com/post/22471865190/the-gentlemen-of-bacongo-is-a-book-released-in

[part 2 ] -  http://www.ourafricablog.com/post/22573195888/part-1-the-gentlemen-of-bacongo-is-a-book 

(Source: ourafrica)

dynamicafrica:

South African illustrator and graphic designer Karabo Poppy Moletsane creates “Sho’t Left" - A Zine on South African occupations.

Describing these collection of images as a representation of “different occupations (along with their tool) found in South Africa”, illustrator Karabo Moletsane drew her inspiration for these drawings from real life.

Moletsane took a trip to Church Square, Pretoria’s Central Business District, where she interviewed people she met about their occupations and the tools they use. During this trip, she came across a taxi driver, a peace officer, a hairdresser and a few “Skhotanes”. 

About this work, Moletsane says:

"The purpose of this zine was to display how unique and different South African occupations are and to inform readers about the exciting facts, tools, people, colour and culture one may encounter when riding in Proudly South African taxi.*"

*FYI, a ‘taxi’ in South Africa is not a cab, but a form of public transportation whereby a registered combi vehicle is used to transport multiple people along a particular route.

Connect with Dynamic Africa on:

Twitter | Facebook | Pinterest | Google+ | Soundcloud | Mixcloud | Instagram | Newsletter

All Africa, All the time.

(via wahalalife)

heisenbergchronicles:

APPRECIATION & INTERVIEW
Bashir Sultani and the art of transformationAnimation student Bashir Sultani uses non-traditional media like table salt, pencils and folded paper to make surprisingly clever pop culture portraits. His recent “never-ending” portrait of Breaking Bad’s Walter White (featured above) is the perfect combination of subject matter, media and technology. The 29-year-old was kind enough to talk with us from his home base at Seneca College in Toronto about the theme of transformation, the perils of using unusual media and why filming the act of making his art is critical to the end result.
You’re a self-taught artist. When did you start experimenting with and creating art? I always used to draw, even before high school. I was sketching my classmates and making art projects for our class. I love to create and use any media that’s around. Mostly, I appreciate traditional art – when you have just a pencil and an idea. I like an idea or message more than drawing itself.
A lot of your work features transformation & evolution – loose salt transforms into portraits, portraits on pencils or paper transform into other portraits. Why is transformation or change central to your art? I like the effect of surprise – when the audience doesn’t know what to expect.
Naturally, Walter White is a perfect subject for this theme. You’ve done several pieces featuring him. What do you like most about the character?Walter White is a legendary character. He is powerful and inspiring. I often make drawings of notable characters from movies and TV, but he is one of the best so far. Especially, when you can see his transformation through the show.
What do you like most about Breaking Bad? I like the idea of getting over your fears and taking responsibility for your life.
Your work predominantly features pop culture subjects? Why pop culture and how do you pick your subjects? Pop culture (and art in general) always inspires people. A great actor or a talented musician change lives and brings joy. It’s always interesting to create portraits of great people. Not just famous, but really notable characters whose appeal spans generations.
I first became familiar with you through your salt portraits? Why salt. It’s a very unusual medium. Salt is a very easily available medium. It’s the most common spice and not costly at all.
What tools do you use when making a salt portrait? How long does it take to create one? I use just any piece of sharp paper, fine white salt and blackboard. I sometimes use colored salt. Each salt drawing typically takes about 2-3 hours, but larger ones can take up to 5 hours.
What’s the hardest part of working with salt? The hardest part is to make sure to move your hands carefully, especially when it comes to creating portrait. A simple mistake can ruin hours of work. Also, the fact that you have camera above is tricky. I try my best to create so that everything can be seen by the camera. If I’m not happy with the result, I redo everything again.
Which portraits are your favorites? I think it’s true with any artist when they like their latest work. I like my Breaking Bad portrait of Walt & Jesse. That was challenging because it was the first time I made two portraits in one piece and it was really large. I also like my Martin Luther King Jr., which took me 8 hours.
Let’s talk about some of your recent work. Lately you’ve doing these transformation pieces using pencils. Again, that’s an unusual choice. Why pencils?I was thinking about the Joker character from The Dark Knight and how to create something fresh. In the Joker’s pencil trick scene, which is one of the most recognizable scenes, I thought about how I can use a pencil to make Joker portrait, but not just draw like many other artists already done. That’s when I first came up with the idea of making art using different sides of pencils as a surface.
You’ve also been making these paper-folding transformation portraits. The Walter White one was masterful. What do you call these? I saw these paper flexagons and never-ending cards on YouTube, and thought of using it to make pop culture characters, just like I thought about pencils.
What’s the process for making one of these? How long does it take to make one? Flexagons are easy to make. There are many tutorials on YouTube. It takes about a half hour to make one. They’re very simple, but fun.
The internet & digital technologies are an important tool for an artist like yourself because videos or animated gifs can help reveal the transformation. It’s like there’s two parts of your art – there’s the creation of the art, but then there’s the filming and distribution of it. Can you talk about that part of your process? We see amazing art all around and people always want to know how the artist created them. They want to see the process from beginning to end. Unfortunately, often you see a super realistic drawing, but the artist cannot show how it’s done. It’s very difficult to show how something is made. Artists that film the process of their work will agree. When I started posting my videos on YouTube, I wanted to show the process, but my main concern was that I should make it entertaining to watch.
What advice can you give other artists who are thinking about trying work like yours? I’m just beginner artist, and I have so much to learn. Advice? Well, don’t be afraid to fail. Don’t be shy to share you art, because your art is only done when it’s seen by others. Challenge yourself. Always take notes when you have any ideas.
What’s next for your art? Have any new media in mind? I am planning to learn animation. That is something I always wanted to make. I have endless ideas, so there are endless opportunities.
Follow Bashir: YouTube: Salt / YouTube: Pencils / Tumblr / Facebook /   Twitter
– Interview by Shayne Bowman, Heisenberg Chronicles

heisenbergchronicles:

APPRECIATION & INTERVIEW

Bashir Sultani and the art of transformation
Animation student Bashir Sultani uses non-traditional media like table salt, pencils and folded paper to make surprisingly clever pop culture portraits. His recent “never-ending” portrait of Breaking Bad’s Walter White (featured above) is the perfect combination of subject matter, media and technology. The 29-year-old was kind enough to talk with us from his home base at Seneca College in Toronto about the theme of transformation, the perils of using unusual media and why filming the act of making his art is critical to the end result.

You’re a self-taught artist. When did you start experimenting with and creating art?
I always used to draw, even before high school. I was sketching my classmates and making art projects for our class. I love to create and use any media that’s around. Mostly, I appreciate traditional art – when you have just a pencil and an idea. I like an idea or message more than drawing itself.

A lot of your work features transformation & evolution – loose salt transforms into portraits, portraits on pencils or paper transform into other portraits. Why is transformation or change central to your art?
I like the effect of surprise – when the audience doesn’t know what to expect.

Naturally, Walter White is a perfect subject for this theme. You’ve done several pieces featuring him. What do you like most about the character?
Walter White is a legendary character. He is powerful and inspiring. I often make drawings of notable characters from movies and TV, but he is one of the best so far. Especially, when you can see his transformation through the show.

What do you like most about Breaking Bad?
I like the idea of getting over your fears and taking responsibility for your life.

Your work predominantly features pop culture subjects? Why pop culture and how do you pick your subjects?
Pop culture (and art in general) always inspires people. A great actor or a talented musician change lives and brings joy. It’s always interesting to create portraits of great people. Not just famous, but really notable characters whose appeal spans generations.

I first became familiar with you through your salt portraits? Why salt. It’s a very unusual medium.
Salt is a very easily available medium. It’s the most common spice and not costly at all.

What tools do you use when making a salt portrait? How long does it take to create one? 
I use just any piece of sharp paper, fine white salt and blackboard. I sometimes use colored salt. Each salt drawing typically takes about 2-3 hours, but larger ones can take up to 5 hours.

What’s the hardest part of working with salt?
The hardest part is to make sure to move your hands carefully, especially when it comes to creating portrait. A simple mistake can ruin hours of work. Also, the fact that you have camera above is tricky. I try my best to create so that everything can be seen by the camera. If I’m not happy with the result, I redo everything again.

Which portraits are your favorites?
I think it’s true with any artist when they like their latest work. I like my Breaking Bad portrait of Walt & Jesse. That was challenging because it was the first time I made two portraits in one piece and it was really large. I also like my Martin Luther King Jr., which took me 8 hours.

Let’s talk about some of your recent work. Lately you’ve doing these transformation pieces using pencils. Again, that’s an unusual choice. Why pencils?
I was thinking about the Joker character from The Dark Knight and how to create something fresh. In the Joker’s pencil trick scene, which is one of the most recognizable scenes, I thought about how I can use a pencil to make Joker portrait, but not just draw like many other artists already done. That’s when I first came up with the idea of making art using different sides of pencils as a surface.

You’ve also been making these paper-folding transformation portraits. The Walter White one was masterful. What do you call these?
I saw these paper flexagons and never-ending cards on YouTube, and thought of using it to make pop culture characters, just like I thought about pencils.

What’s the process for making one of these? How long does it take to make one?
Flexagons are easy to make. There are many tutorials on YouTube. It takes about a half hour to make one. They’re very simple, but fun.

The internet & digital technologies are an important tool for an artist like yourself because videos or animated gifs can help reveal the transformation. It’s like there’s two parts of your art – there’s the creation of the art, but then there’s the filming and distribution of it. Can you talk about that part of your process?
We see amazing art all around and people always want to know how the artist created them. They want to see the process from beginning to end. Unfortunately, often you see a super realistic drawing, but the artist cannot show how it’s done. It’s very difficult to show how something is made. Artists that film the process of their work will agree. When I started posting my videos on YouTube, I wanted to show the process, but my main concern was that I should make it entertaining to watch.

What advice can you give other artists who are thinking about trying work like yours? I’m just beginner artist, and I have so much to learn.
Advice? Well, don’t be afraid to fail. Don’t be shy to share you art, because your art is only done when it’s seen by others. Challenge yourself. Always take notes when you have any ideas.

What’s next for your art? Have any new media in mind?
I am planning to learn animation. That is something I always wanted to make. I have endless ideas, so there are endless opportunities.

Follow BashirYouTube: Salt / YouTube: PencilsTumblrFacebook /   Twitter

– Interview by Shayne Bowman, Heisenberg Chronicles